Kitchen Culture
tasty tidbits from the old-fashioned Japanese Kitchen

DOBIN  土瓶 & DOBIN MUSHI  土瓶蒸し

Named after the teapot-shaped vessel, dobin, in which it is served, dobin mushi is a steam-poached dish that traps aromatic vapors in the pot, transforming them into an intensely flavored liquid. Sudachi or kabosu limes are also part of the setting; the juice is squeezed into the pot. The miniature cup that sits perched atop the pot (when its brought to table) is used to drink the broth. Once the broth has been enjoyed, the lid is set aside and the various morsels that produced the broth are eaten. Here, I offer you a chicken-and-mushroom version.
DOWNLOAD the RECIPE.

The vessels are sold at many Asian grocery stores, and are a charming addition to the table.

Although Matsutaké mushrooms are the most prized, any variety -- or better yet, a combination of several -- will produce a delicious broth. In Japan, the six varieties pictured below are readily available in the autumn. Seek out whatever seems best in your local markets. I offer you information and instruction on preparing the six varieties pictured here in a separate reference sheet.
       

                               DOWNLOAD the REFERENCE SHEET.


MUSHROOMS
KINOKO RUI 茸類



Top row:
Shiméji & Éringi 









Middle  row:
Matsutaké

Shiitak
é








Bottom row:
É
nokidaké
Mait
aké


i